Poverty, cloaked in invisibility, easily fights the forces of compassion and concern, aided by the political rhetoric well worn, and the misguided notion that “it could never happen to me,” which rests easy on our sense of superiority –

– a simple lack of imagination by our pride driven demons (we think we’ve regulated them to a voice on our shoulder, as our intellects grow stronger and our hearts grow colder)

– as our eyes wander with constant judgments about what happened to them, an equally important question is what happened to us, when we can walk among them and not feel anything…

except maybe, apathy… and fear.

 

 

Painting Our Illusions in 108 words a day.

10 Comments

    1. I’m sure if you’ve experienced some level of poverty that you would certainly be more likely to have compassion. Although I wrote it as if to individuals, really I meant it as a culture we seem to look past it. In politics they always talk about the middle class, whether or not they really care about them either, but the poor are not really a voting bloc so get looked over.

      Liked by 2 people

  1. I am so surprised to see that I haven’t commented on this post. I sure had a comment in mind when I read it this morning!

    I read a book in the 90’s that stuck with me ever since. The book was “The Balkan Express” written during the Serbo-Croatian war. The part I remember most is the part that talks about how we turn people, even friends, into the “other” as a way to deal with our sense of pain and overwhelm. I can’t repeat it all here but will give a sample: “To deal with pain on such a scale is in a way much easier than to deal with individuals. With a person you know, you have to do something, act, give food, shelter, money, take care. On the other hand, one person could certainly not be expected to take care of a whole mass of people. For them, there has to be someone else, the state, a church, the Red Cross, Caritas, an institution. The moment one delegates personal responsibility to the institution, the war becomes more normal, orderly and therefore more bearable.”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for reading! Not sure how long I can go on with 108 words a day without repeating myself, but I guess there is always fun in finding new ways to say the same thing… Also I can catalog for myself, how many things are important enough to me, for me to write about.

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